Tutorial – How to Make Reusable Baby Wipes

I thought I’d write a quick tutorial on how to make homemade reusable baby wipes. I basically cut up 4-5 old hand towels and edged them with bias binding. Plus, I made some zipped pouches from leftover material scraps and a few pence for zips – have some unlined for clean wipes and some with waterproof lining for dirties. Let’s hope they work! I will report back in a few months.

  1. Cut up your old hand towels. I based my sizing roughly on commercially available microfibre, reusable, towelling wipes. I figured I’d make mine slightly larger, so as not to waste any material and it also meant less cutting! So, as my towels were folded in half, then into quarters and then again into eighths – I went with that and cut each towel into 8 pieces, rectangular in shape.
  2. I purchased a roll of white 25mm bias binding from my local fabric shop and pinned this around the raw edges (half each side of the edge, if you’re new to this). I didn’t need to bind every edge because the towels were already bound when whole.
  3. Then I stitched this in place using my sewing machine. You will need to use a heavy duty or jeans needle for this thickness of fabric. And that’s it – you have your wipes! They will be machine washable and tumble dryable at 60 degrees C, just like they were as towels. I plan on just chucking mine in with the reusable nappies.
  4. I decided to make these fabric cases to put mine in and they should also be very portable, when out and about or travelling. The design comes from a Cath Kidston sewing book (which I was very kindly given for Christmas). I have just made some unlined and some with a waterproof layer of PUL. I will see if I can get a tutorial up for those soon. I used fabric and ribbon scraps that I had leftover from other projects. The only items I had to purchase was a few zips for pence and the PUL fabric. I’ll report back on how they do – I may need to waterproof the seams of the wet bags. If you’re not into sewing, you can buy similar reusable wipes here and wet bags here.

Happy sewing people! Let me know how you get on in the comments.

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Sew Your Own Apron

I’ve been practising my sewing skills again. I’m quite chuffed with how these have turned out. I just cut around an apron I already owned, so no pattern was involved. Then I just copied how it was put together. These are very quick and easy, taking around 1 hour to make from start to finish. I used cotton fabric and bought cotton tape from the fabric shop for the ties. I have to say I’m in love with the teapot print fabric, I may just have to find an excuse to use it some more!

You just need to cut around your original apron, leaving an extra 3cm for the seams. Measure and cut out your pocket, again leaving 3 cm all around for seams. I ironed my seams and turned them over twice, attaching the tapes into the seam for strength. Make sure to turn over the ends of your tapes twice and stitch them, to stop them from fraying. Make sure you sew your side seams first, then your top and bottom hems. What a lovely gift these would make. I bought a metre of each fabric and I have loads left for other projects, so I’d estimate these cost around £2 each to make. They are so satisfying to make, there was no traipsing the shops for gifts and no-one was harmed in the making. What could be better than homemade?

Are you planning to make any gifts this Christmas?

Making a Vintage 1970s Maxi Skirt From An Original Pattern

I mentioned yesterday that I’m learning to sew- here is my finished Vintage 1970s Maxi Skirt and I absolutely love it! I found this floral print corduroy after much searching in local fabric shops (apparently printed corduroy isn’t in fashion, but I will always love it). I pickup up with pattern in a charity shop somewhere for 99p and it was un-used.

It was a Very Easy Vogue pattern- the skirt was cut in just 3 pieces- front panel, back panel and waistband. I had to add a couple of inches on to the pattern all over because a vintage 14 is a bit small on me. My sewing teacher helped me to do this and to hem it. As it’s a full circle skirt, the hem was a bit tricker than I imagined. I added some red bias trim to the pockets because I thought it would show them off a bit and voila! I will definitely be making this skirt again. I still have the blouse to try if I want to as well. I’m pairing it with a vintage pair of bright red court shoes that I found in a charity shop for 99p – I think they’re 80s, but they were brand new with tags and a perfect match! The jumper I’ve had for absolutely years (originally bought new), but it’s a good fit with lots of things. I also found an M&S cashmere, belted cardigan for £4 in a charity shop that I’m hoping will match this and a vintage Laura Ashley maroon velvet quilted jacket for £5.50. More photos to follow!