UK Shoppers Spend One Billion Pounds Less on Clothing

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Minimalism is hitting the UK, with Millennials spending in excess of One Billion Pounds less on clothing last year. With firms such as M&S, French Connection failing to turn a profit and High Street stalwart Jaegar going into administration – it really seems that the tide is beginning to turn. Fashion is just not in fashion any longer!

So what exactly are UK shoppers spending their money on instead? The answer is experiences. The High Street chains are now getting in on the act aiming to flood you with a choice of ‘shopping experiences’; with nail bars popping up in Superdrug. Mintel reports that people are spending much more money on going out and eating out. Retailers are looking for ways to encourage people to come into their physical stores, since the explosion of online shopping. Each is looking to create a unique shopping environment, to encourage you to part with your cash.

Next are planning to incorporate florists within their stores, along with upmarket restaurants and a Prosecco Bar. River Island has a style studio, complete with a personal shopper. They will whisk you into a VIP area, ply you with Prosecco and then you’ll get to try on lots of personally recommended products. Trainer retailer Superga has introduced artists into store, so that you can select a trainer and have the artist paint it for you. Topshop have employed virtual reality in their stores, to take things to a whole new dimension. Their Oxford Street store has recently had a virtual water slide installed which includes a virtual whale – the experience is called ‘Splash’! Along with pumping the smell of suncream into the air. It’s all to promote their swimwear range.

Oasis have ‘Saucer and Spritz’ cafes in some stores now; offering cake, champagne, cocktails, afternoon tea and Unicorn Toast (no I don’t know what that is either!?!) Activewear brand Sweaty Betty offers free in-store exercise classes. Beware though – obviously these brands still want to actually sell you stuff. These exercise classes will not only take place in-store, so everywhere you look, you will be exposed to temptation. But the instructors will not only be looking svelte and toned; they will of course be clad from head to toe in Sweaty Betty! These are the new lifestyle ambassadors, also put forward through online associations with lifestyle bloggers. All in a bid to help push their stuff.

What do you think of this change? I have mixed feelings about it because I know there is an underlying motive. However, it does at least encourage people to acquire less (in part anyway, depending on the store). I guess I’d just rather see people using their spare cash to more profitable ends, like building community and helping those in need.

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It’s About Things That Wear In, Not Things That Wear Out.

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I’ve been watching a fabulous documentary series about the history of the London Underground. It’s called ‘Going Underground’ and it’s on Channel 5. I’ve long been a fan the London Underground. Since my Father and his parents hail from our fine capital city; I spent a significant portion of my time there growing up. I’ve always loved the architecture of the stations, the branding, the furniture – icons such as the subway tiles, the Underground Map and the whole ambience. My Father remembers when steam trains operated on the lines.

A man called Frank Peck re-designed Piccadilly Circus station in the 1920s. The whole ethos of his design was to create ‘flow’; a movement of people through the station. This had been sadly lacking in its Edwardian predecessor, with halting lifts and cramped ticket hall. He aimed to create a circular ticket hall, a bit like a roundabout to keep people moving. Something he later repeated in other Modernist stations he designed, such as Arnos Grove.

Within his design at Piccadilly, he chose to use elements like pillars to create a feeling of space, by giving the appearance of raising the ceiling. What really struck me was that he used materials such as brass for the pillars and ticket lobby, along with marble tiles on the walls. He wanted the station to reflect the area it was situated in (The West End), but more than this he wanted to use materials that wear in, not materials that wear out. You know that aged patina that can only come with the passage of time. I don’t see that as a faded glory, but I think it adds to something’s beauty or charm.

Even today, Piccadilly is at the back of the waiting list for refurbishment because it was built so well back in the days that it was felt it could survive the longest! That is a testament to buying once, is it not? I wonder if the same will be able to be said of today’s Underground in 100 years time? The trains that run on the line today are 1970s rolling stock and although the oldest, they are the most reliable trains on the Underground to day! Even these trains are based on an original 1930s design by guess who….Frank Pick! They were a simple design which also made them simple to repair and maintain.

Some lessons for us all on Simplicity and Minimalism from London’s own, iconic Underground! I would never have thought such secrets lay within and I can only hope that those who are taking it forward will learn from it, continuing to employ such common sense.1200px-Underground.svg