Why Thermos Flasks and other glass vacuum flasks are not Zero Waste!

I’m publishing this post as a warning to all that purchasing a Thermos brand or other brand flask, with a glass vacuum liner is just about the WORST choice you can make when trying to live a Zero Waste lifestyle. They are promoted as an alternative to buying drinks out and will potentially save you money.

I grew up with my parents taking them everywhere – in fact they still do! It always used to be the case that you could buy a new glass liner, if yours ever broke. I chose a glass lined one because they are known to keep drinks hotter for much, much longer than metal walled flasks and I thought I would be able to replace the parts as needed. But be warned- not any more! You have to buy a whole new flask – you cannot buy a replacement branded or otherwise, not anywhere! This means your entire plastic flask has to go in the bin. Let me tell you that I am completely horrified at this state of affairs. I hope that Thermos gets bombarded with complaints which forces them to bring back the replacement parts.

IMG_5684So, you can expect to be shelling out for the entire cost of a new flask every time yours breaks and having to live with the knowledge that you are adding non-recyclable plastic to the World’s landfill sites. I wonder just how many perfectly good flask shells are sitting in the bin, for want of a glass liner. Honestly, the thought makes me feel slightly sick!

I’d love to hear if anyone knows of a truly Zero Waste flask – one that you only have to buy once!

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Get 300 bonus SB when you sign up for Swagbucks in April

Spring is here, and there’s no better time to start earning free gift cards through Swagbucks!

All throughout April you can earn large bonuses when sign up as my referral on Swagbucks. Swagbucks is a rewards site where you earn points (called SB) for things you’re probably doing online already, like searching the web, watching videos, shopping, discovering deals, and taking surveys. Then you take those points and exchange them for gift cards to places like Amazon, M&S, or PayPal cash.

When you sign up through me this month, you can earn a 300 SB bonus! Here’s how:

1. Sign up using this link

2. Earn 300 SB total before May 1st, 2019. You’ll get a 300 SB bonus for it!

3. That’s it. It’s super easy, and Swagbucks is for real. I use it myself, and I’ve earned almost £3,000 to date. I use Swagbucks to buy gift cards for my favourite stores, like: M&S, John Lewis and Amazon. Then I can treat myself or my family at no cost!

How I got a free heated airer from John Lewis worth £100! Thanks to Swagbucks

Yes, I got this £100 heated airer free all thanks to the website Swagbucks! It’s my most recent purchase from John Lewis, to make my life easier with all the extra washing that’s around since having my baby. I figure that running an airer is cheaper than running the tumble dryer so much. It’s winter and there’s so little daylight, so much bad weather and with a North facing garden – it’s a waste of time putting washing on the rotary line. I’ve been relying on my indoor airer, but it just couldn’t cope with the volume of washing being produced, plus with everything needing 2 days to dry – it’s just impractical. I figure a heated airer will also reduce condensation in the home, making it healthier to live in too. From a zero waste point of view, it comes with a 2 year guarantee – quite a rare thing these days! It’s also mostly comprised of lightweight aluminium metal, except for the feet and top hinges. The whole things folds down for easy storage and it is surprisingly compact when up.

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Nappy Changing Tips & Zero Waste Fails

I read a lot of Zero Waste blogs, social media groups and websites before my baby was born. Lots of them wanted to tell me to stick to all-natural, plastic free, even homemade items. But, reality bites once your baby is here and you’re seriously sleep-deprived! The truth is you don’t have time to make your own anything, barely even a cup of tea! That said, I had been prepared with a tub of coconut oil as I’d read that this was ‘the best’ thing for nappy rash. What a load of bull!!!! Thank goodness that Bepanthen decided to send me a little surprise in the post. The timing couldn’t have been better!

Bepanthen rescued my poor little baby’s bottom in under 24 hours! It comes in a handy tube with a flip top lid, which is even manageable with one hand – very handy at nappy change time! You can buy a smaller tube which is ideal for your changing bag on the move and I also keep the large tube at home. It lasts for ages, as you only need a very small amount at each change. In my experience, it’s worth applying it at every change to keep a barrier between the nappy contents and your baby’s skin.

It spreads easily, no matter what the temperature outside and it really does work, unlike the stupid coconut oil. It also helps to change your baby’s nappy every 3 hours, or immediately once they have pooped. Try to give your baby some nappy free time each day too, if you can.

Not only is Bepanthen clinically proven to protect babies delicate skin, unlike coconut oil! It also contains natural ingredients, like Provitamin B5 (Panthenol), Beeswax and Lanolin to soothe and protect. I know what I’ll be reaching for from now on.

(Disclaimer: I was sent a free tube of Bepanthen for the purposes of reviewing. However, all opinions are my own and I had already chosen to use this product, based on the strength of other peoples positive reviews online).

Resuable Vs Disposable Nappies – Pampers Pure

I was all for cloth nappies before I had my baby – good for my pocket, good for the environment, right? Well, that may be true but then the realities of parenting hit – the lack of sleep, being out and about, not being able to leave the room long enough to hang out the washing, let alone the fact that our baby seems to hate cloth nappies. The first time we tried them he went from being a normal, contented baby who took regular naps –  to being sleepless, hot, uncomfortable and generally extremely grouchy. For no other reason than the nappy!

We’ve tried them again several times, but the wraps seem to cut into his skin and they’re so bulky, he can hardly bend his legs. They make him hot- granted we have had an extremely hot summer, but I really don’t get all these people who say that they’re breathable. And then there’s the fact he’s literally sitting in urine for hours, you have to change them much more frequently than disposables and that’s before we even get to the washing of them all! This is also all complicated by my health conditions which mean I have limited energy. I have very quickly realised that I want to spend the best of my health and time with my baby and not completing household chores (which have gone out of the window anyway, since I simply don’t have time nor energy to complete them).

So I was happy when Pampers sent me a packet of their new Pure nappies and wipes to try. We haven’t been using wipes, but I recently bought a packet of Water Wipes for our holiday as you can’t be out and about, trying to mess around with cotton wool and water, when your baby has had a poo’splosion!!! I’m certain from writing this blog, that there are plenty of other parents out there who want to choose a more natural option for their family, but practicality has to come first.

The Pampers Pure nappies are really thick and good quality, even more premium than their premium protection which is what we had been using. That’s a big deal, as so many natural nappies and similar products just don’t hold up in use, breaking apart. They have these cute little designs on them – there are a couple more which I didn’t have the opportunity to photograph, I’d describe them as abstract art. Pampers say they contain less chemicals than their standard or premium nappies, which I’ll have to take their word for as I’m not a scientist. I’ve had absolutely no leaks whilst using these which I know isn’t always the case with other nappies. They also don’t leave any red marks on my baby’s skin which is a major concern for me.

The only major downside for me, is that it’s really hard to tell which is the front and which is the back, so I keep putting them on backwards. The tabs are white which make them hard to see and these are just really difficult, compared to their standard or premium nappies which I’ve never had this problem with.

The Pampers Pure wipes are easy to use; aren’t all wipes?! Whilst remaining tough, durable and don’t irritate my baby’s skin. As with all wipes, I keep these for cleaning up poo and when out and about only because I don’t want to be putting a lot of these in the bin to respect our planet.

Overall, these nappies are made from cotton, plant-based materials and other ‘thoughtfully selected’ (not sure what that means)! materials. I like the fact that there is an easily available option out there on the high street, for those of us who want a purer option but for whom reusables are just not going to work. There isn’t a perfect option out there and whilst I’d prefer not to be clogging up landfill with disposable nappies, we have to choose something that works for both us and our children.

Things That Have Gone – 23

I said that I’d probably still manage to get rid of a few more items! Well it amounts to a cardigan and a pair of shoes sold on eBay, 2 bags of clothes returned to their original owners and 2 books sold on Amazon Marketplace.

Yet more things that weren’t actually needed! I expect the odd item will still sell on eBay in the coming months, as I have a handful left listed.

More Musings on the Story of Stuff – Branding & Marketing

As I said yesterday, I’m currently reading this book:

Today, in the chapter on distribution I struck upon something horrifying. I guess I sort of knew this already, but seeing it in black and white is even more shocking. I’m sure we all know that most companies out there don’t actually make the stuff they sell, but they buy it in and have unknown manufacturers make it for them. We’ve seen this so much in the clothing industry where brands like H&M and Primark have clothes made up in India and take no responsibility for the working practices of those in their supply chain. This is all part of these companies plans to cut costs, basically by abdicating responsibility.

This efficiency driven, cost-cutting is pervasive. Companies don’t make the stuff they sell, they simply brand it. Apple don’t make computers, but they sure as heck have created a brand that people crave. H&M don’t make clothes, Nike doesn’t make trainers. They all simply buy the garments and items from producers, or the parts to assemble them and often not even from the same factory, but from multiple producers. It’s quite possible that one factory churns out the exact same product for multiple retailers.

So really, let’s face it – it’s often not the item we are buying, but we’ve been sold on the brand. The founder of Nike even admitted that the company once saw themselves as production oriented, but that they now understand their most important function is to market the product. So guess where they put all their money? Advertising. And often this advertising isn’t even for a specific product, it’s all about the image they want to associate with their brand. Nike aren’t selling your trainers, they are selling you a fashion statement that in this climate will probably be outdated in a mere 2 weeks!